maven

Weblogic Plugin to Set Deployment Order

WebLogic Server 12 has updates to the plugin that allow features such as being able to start/stop servers as well as run WLST scripting. The reason the WLST scripting is a beneficial feature is that the plugin is being used deploy all assets to a target environment (like wars, optional packages, and resources). In deploying all these resources through a build script, it becomes necessary to set the deployment order when assets have a dependency on a resource already being available prior to the asset being started during deployment or start-up of the managed server.

In order to modify the deployment order, a WLST script has to be used because the WebLogic Server 12 plugin does not support setting the deployment order through the maven script. So in order to utilize the newer WebLogic Server 12 maven plugin, it an install of WebLogic Server 12 so that it can utilize the install for running WLST scripts and other functioanility.

In the use case, the servers that exist within the environments is running 11g, however, in order to take advantage of this new feature, the build management system needs access to WebLogic Server 12c. As mentioned previously, this means that WebLogic Server 12 is installed on the build management box (in this case Hudson), so that the Hudson jobs have access to the install for WLST. The tests were ran utilizing the 12c version of the plugin to modify deployment orders on the 11g install and it worked. The only problem with running WLST scripts through Hudson builds is that doing multiple WLST scripts means opening a session with WebLogic Server and then closing that session, multiple times. This overhead is a memory hog and ultimately crashed the Hudson box. So the code/scripting is there to utilize the deployment order, but because of resource constraints, this functionality isn’t currently being used.

The following are the steps I took: 1) Installed WebLogic Server 12c to a local folder WLS_12C_MIDDLEWARE_PATH on the build server 2) Followed all steps from http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E24329_01/web.1211/e24368/maven.htm#CHEFAEBI for apache-maven-2.2.x. 3) Started the target Weblogic server 11g at (11g-IP-addr):7001 4) Edited a project pom.xml for deploying the war:

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<project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xsi:schemalocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/maven-v4_0_0.xsd"> <modelversion>4.0.0</modelversion> <groupid>com.oracle.test</groupid> <artifactid>sample2</artifactid><packaging>war</packaging> <version>1.0-SNAPSHOT</version> <name>sample2 Maven Webapp</name> <url>http://maven.apache.org</url> <dependencies> <dependency> <groupid>junit</groupid> <artifactid>junit</artifactid> <version>3.8.1</version> <scope>test</scope> </dependency> </dependencies> <build> <finalname>sample-war</finalname><plugins><plugin> <groupid>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupid> <artifactid>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactid> <configuration> <source>1.6 <target>1.6</target> </configuration> </plugin><plugin> <groupid>com.oracle.weblogic</groupid> <artifactid>wls-maven-plugin</artifactid> <version>12.1.1.0</version> <configuration> <adminurl>t3://(local-IP):7001</adminurl> <user>weblogic</user><password>weblogic1</password> <upload>true</upload> <action>deploy</action> <remote>false</remote> <verbose>true</verbose> <source>target/sample-war-10.war <name>sample-war-10</name> </configuration> <executions> <execution><phase>install</phase> <goals> <goal>deploy</goal> <goal>undeploy</goal> </goals> </execution> </executions> </plugin> </plugins> </build> </project>

5) Ran a maven command based on the pom for deploying sample-war-10.war:

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 mvn wls:deploy -DmiddlewareHome=(WLS_12C_MIDDLEWARE_PATH)

I had to use -DmiddlewareHome because the element in pom.xml didn’t work. 6) Created the following WLST script for changing the deployment order (changeOrder.py):

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 from java.util import * from javax.management import * import javax.management.Attribute
<p>
    print 'starting the script .... '
</p>
<p>
    connect('weblogic', 'weblogic1', "t3://(11g-IP-addr):7001") edit() startEdit() cd('AppDeployments') cd('sample') set ('DeploymentOrder', 115) save() activate() disconnect() exit()

7) Then incorporated that script within the wls-maven-plugin:

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</p>
<plugin> <groupid>com.oracle.weblogic</groupid> <artifactid>wls-maven-plugin</artifactid> <executions> <execution><phase>package</phase> <goals> <goal>wlst</goal> </goals> </execution> </executions> <configuration>  from java.util import * from javax.management import * import javax.management.Attribute
<p>
    print 'Updating deployment order .... '
</p>
<p>
    connect(System.getProperty("deploy.user"), System.getProperty("deploy.password"), System.getProperty("deploy.admin")) edit() startEdit() cd(System.getProperty("deploy.mbean")) cd(System.getProperty("deploy.library.name")) set ('DeploymentOrder', System.getProperty("deploy.order")) save() activate() disconnect()

8) Then ran the WLST call from the maven plugin:

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 mvn wls:wlst -DfileName=changeOrder.py -DmiddlewareHome=(WLS_12C_MIDDLEWARE_PATH)

Properties are fed into the python script from Maven properties (based on a profile which is different for applications, resources, and optional packages).

This is because within the JNDI hierarchy through WLST, these assets get different Types, different versions, and different name. We can see this by logging into the server through a WLST command window and simply running an ls() command on the application or library directory. For instance, the following is an example of running the ls() command on the war. We can see that the type is AppDeployment and that the Identifier and Name are similar.

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 wls:/sandbox/serverConfig/AppDeployments/sample-war-10> ls() dr--   SubDeployments dr--   Targets -r--   AbsoluteInstallDir                           null -r--   AbsolutePlanDir                              null -r--   AbsolutePlanPath                             null -r--   AbsoluteSourcePath                           /domains/sandbox/servers/sandboxAdminServer/upload/sample-war-10/app/sample-war.war -r--   ApplicationIdentifier                        sample-war-10 -r--   ApplicationName                              sample-war-10 -r--   CompatibilityName                            null -r--   DeploymentOrder                              102 -r--   DeploymentPlan                               null -r--   DeploymentPlanExternalDescriptors            null -r--   DeploymentPrincipalName                      null -r--   InstallDir                                   null -r--   ModuleType                                   war -r--   Name                                         sample-war-10 -r--   Notes                                        null -r--   PlanDir                                      null -r--   PlanPath                                     null -r--   SecurityDDModel                              DDOnly -r--   SourcePath                                   servers/sandboxAdminServer/upload/sample-war-10/app/sample-war.war -r--   StagingMode                                  null -r--   Type                                         AppDeployment -r--   ValidateDDSecurityData                       false -r--   VersionIdentifier                            null -r-x   freezeCurrentValue                           Void : String(attributeName) -r-x   isSet                                        Boolean : String(propertyName) -r-x   unSet                                        Void : String(propertyName)

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Now we will run the same command, but this time on an Optional Package, like our cxfFull that we created with Apache Shade. We can see here that the type is Library instead of AppDeployment, and that the ApplicationIdentifier includes the Manifest versions identified for this Optional Package. Therefore we need to feed in different properties when attempting to change the deployment order for an application asset as opposed to a library asset.

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 wls:/sandbox/serverConfig/Libraries/cxfFull#2.4.5@2.4.5> ls() dr--   SubDeployments dr--   Targets -r--   AbsoluteInstallDir                           null -r--   AbsolutePlanDir                              null -r--   AbsolutePlanPath                             null -r--   AbsoluteSourcePath                           /domains/sandbox/servers/sandboxAdminServer/upload/cxfFull/2.4.5@2.4.5/app/cxf-full.jar -r--   ApplicationIdentifier                        cxfFull#2.4.5@2.4.5 -r--   ApplicationName                              cxfFull -r--   CompatibilityName                            null -r--   DeploymentOrder                              95 -r--   DeploymentPlan                               null -r--   DeploymentPlanExternalDescriptors            null -r--   DeploymentPrincipalName                      null -r--   InstallDir                                   null -r--   ModuleType                                   null -r--   Name                                         cxfFull#2.4.5@2.4.5 -r--   Notes                                        null -r--   PlanDir                                      null -r--   PlanPath                                     null -r--   SecurityDDModel                              DDOnly -r--   SourcePath                                   servers/sandboxAdminServer/upload/cxfFull/2.4.5@2.4.5/app/cxf-full.jar -r--   StagingMode                                  null -r--   Type                                         Library -r--   ValidateDDSecurityData                       false -r--   VersionIdentifier                            2.4.5@2.4.5 -r-x   freezeCurrentValue                           Void : String(attributeName) -r-x   isSet                                        Boolean : String(propertyName) -r-x   unSet                                        Void : String(propertyName)

Of course, this can be easily done through the console, but the ability to do it through the usage of the Maven Plugin can speed up the deployment process. One of the ways that we could have sped up the utilization of this plugin would be to open a WLST session, modify the deployment order of all the assets we were deploying and then closed the WLST session. Instead of trying to open, modify, close a session for each asset that was being deployed.

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WebLogic Optional Packages and Dependency Maturity

So I mentioned in another post about a Dependency Maturity Model where I will pull the environmental properties from our WAR deployments. The way I accomplish this with WebLogic is by making the jar file that holds the environmental property like an OSGi bundle for WebLogic (which is an optional package). This is not a very complex exercise, it is really about giving a JAR information with it’s MANIFEST.MF to identify it’s versions and a JAR key, then referencing that within deployments that use the JAR (like a WAR).

I configure the maven-jar-plugin to put additional information to the MANIFEST.MF

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<plugin>
    <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-jar-plugin</artifactId>
    <configuration>
        <archive>
            <manifestEntries>
                <Manifest-Version>1.0</Manifest-Version>
                <Extension-Name>envProperties</Extension-Name>
                <Specification-Version>${env.spec.version}</Specification-Version>
                <Implementation-Version>${env.impl.version}</Implementation-Version>
            </manifestEntries>
        </archive>
    </configuration>
</plugin>

Once this JAR is built through our Maven project, I need to deploy it out to WebLogic utilizing the maven-weblogic-plugin (for WLS 11). There are two interesting pieces of information regarding the link to the WebLogic Server 11 and WebLogic Server 12 versions of the plugin. The WebLogic Server 12 version appears to have a bug and does not support deploying libraries at all and therefore I have to utilize the WebLogic Server 11 version of the maven plugin. The second issue though is that the WebLogic Server 11 version of the plugin does not support the library capability through XML, it has to be supplied as a command line argument.

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<plugin>
    <groupId>com.oracle.weblogic</groupId>
    <artifactId>weblogic-maven-plugin</artifactId>
    <executions>
        <execution>
            <id>deploy</id>
            <phase>compile</phase>
            <goals>
                <goal>deploy</goal>
            </goals>
            <configuration>
                <adminurl>t3://${target.hostname}:${target.port}</adminurl>
                <user>${target.userId}</user>
                <password>${target.password}</password>
                <upload>true</upload>
                <action>deploy</action>
                <targets>${target.cluster}</targets>
                <remote>true</remote>
                <verbose>true</verbose>
                <library>true</library>
                <source>${project.build.directory}/lib/${property.name}.jar</source>
                <name>envProperties</name>
            </configuration>
        </execution>
    </executions>
</plugin>

So the main piece of configuration here that differentiates this from a normal WAR or EAR deployment is the true. This XML element is supposed to identify this deployment as an Optional Package, but this field does not work. In order to bypass this error, when I run the maven goal to fire off this plugin, I have to pass in a -Dlibrary=true for this resource to successfully deploy as an Optional Package (otherwise WebLogic will generate an error that this is an invalid resource type).

The next step is to make modifications to our WAR so that it can become aware of the Optional Package. I do this by modifying a maven plugin so that it can build references in the WAR’s MANIFEST.MF to the JAR’s MANIFEST.MF.

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<plugin>
    <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-war-plugin</artifactId>
    <configuration>
        <archive>
            <manifestEntries>
                <Manifest-Version>1.0</Manifest-Version>
                                           
                <Extension-List>envProperties cxfFull</Extension-List>
                <envProperties-Extension-Name>envProperties</envProperties-Extension-Name>
                <envProperties-Specification-Version>${env.spec.version}</envProperties-Specification-Version>
                <envProperties-Implementation-Version>${env.spec.version}</envProperties-Implementation-Version>
                                           
                <cxfFull-Extension-Name>cxfFull</cxfFull-Extension-Name>
                <cxfFull-Implementation-Version>${cxfFull.spec.version}</cxfFull-Implementation-Version>
                <cxfFull-Specification-Version>${cxfFull.spec.version}</cxfFull-Specification-Version>
            </manifestEntries>
        </archive>
        <packagingExcludes>WEB-INF/lib/cxf*.jar</packagingExcludes>
    </configuration>
</plugin>

There are some additional interesting items that I have in this configuration that I can go over, but let’s first talk about how I reference the environment property JAR.

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<Extension-List>envProperties cxfFull</Extension-List>
<envProperties-Extension-Name>envProperties</envProperties-Extension-Name>
<envProperties-Specification-Version>${env.spec.version}</envProperties-Specification-Version>
<envProperties-Implementation-Version>${env.spec.version}</envProperties-Implementation-Version>

In the Extension-List tag, I list all the *-Extension-Name configurations that I have. So in the previous section of the configuration, I have an envProperties-Extension-Name=envProperties and a cxfFull-Extension-Name=cxfFull. I therefore need to list these values in the Extension-List element. The next step is to reference the Implementation/Specification Versions and I do this by using the *-Extension-Name value as the key in the name of the configuration. So if our key is envProperties, our *-Extension-Name becomes envProperties-Extension-Name, our *-Specification-Version becomes envProperties-Specification-Version, and our *-Implementation-Version becomes envProperties-Implementation-Version.

The other important piece of configuration here is the . I utilize this feature to remove jars (that I have designated as Optional Packages) so that they will not be included into the built war file. The reason for this again is that these jars will be available via Optional Packages and therefore I remove them from the war and therefore reduce the size of the war and increase performance for startup/deployment.

Now that I have been able to create the reference between the two, once the WAR is deployed, it will create a link between it and the environment properties JAR. In fact, if I log into our WebLogic console and click on our environment properties deployment and I can see all the other deployments that are using it. These relationships will be listed under the “Applications that reference this Library” table.

Because of this relationship, anytime I need to redeploy the environmental properties jar or any Optional Package, I will need to start/stop the web applications that use the specific Optional Package. This allows that web application to reload the new changes to the Optional Package (unfortunately it does not appear to be dynamic), but it also does not require us to restart the Admin/Managed Server instances.

For more additional information about the weblogic-maven-plugin, see my other post as to how I deploy wars using this plugin.

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Deploying applications to WebLogic with weblogic-maven-plugin

WebLogic has made the deployment of artifacts and resources significantly easier for Maven projects through the new plugin capabilities with weblogic-maven-plugin (WLS 11) and now the wls-maven-plugin (WLS 12). The newer version of the plugin has many additional features, but also has quite a few bugs and therefore I will use the capabilities of both plugins. The general usage of the plugins is to deploy our application resources (such as JDBC and JMS configurations), our optional packages, our web applications, and also to run wlst scripts against those deployments to change their deployment order.

The plugin is not something that can be downloaded directly, it is included within the installs for WebLogic Server 11 or WebLogic Server 12. So in order to get access to the plugin, I first install both servers locally. Once I do this, I can access the plugins:

1) With WebLogic Server 11, I can build the weblogic-maven-plugin using the wljarbuilder.jar

2) With WebLogic Server 12, I can find the plugin already available via out install directory at: $MIDDLEWARE_PATH_12C_ZIP/wlserver/server/lib/wls-maven-plugin.jar

Once I have access to these plugin jars, I will load them into our Maven repository manager (which is Nexus, but also could be Artifactory…for example). This way our plugin jars will be available to all our maven projects, and I will configure them through our plugin poms.

When using the plugin for deployments, I will need to gather some information such as what environments I will be deploying the resources to, what server names are, what cluster names are, what ports, what type of resource, the name I want the deployment to be, and other information. Since the deployments will change per environment, one beneficial strategy is to design a property file per environment. Once this is complete, I can use maven property substitution to derive our deployment information dynamically during the plugin runtime from the environment specific properties.

For more details on the Properties Maven Plugin. There is one nuance or issue with this plugin that you should be aware of, is it does not support properties within a jar file. If you follow this thread in stackoverflow.com, you will see a working plugin that uses the concepts of the “Properties Maven Plugin”, but allows the reading of properties from an external jar file: properties-ext-maven-plugin. This way I can run the external properties plugin prior to the weblogic-maven-plugin to read in our environment specific properties (one jar for each environment containing specific properties for that environment).

Now I can configure our weblogic-maven-plugin within our pom file:

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<plugin> <groupid>com.oracle.weblogic</groupid> <artifactid>weblogic-maven-plugin</artifactid> <version>${weblogic.version}</version> <executions> <execution> <id>deploy</id><phase>compile</phase> <goals> <goal>deploy</goal> </goals> <configuration> <adminurl>t3://${deploy.hostname}:${deploy.port}</adminurl> <user>${deploy.userId}</user><password>${deploy.password}</password> <upload>true</upload> <action>deploy</action> <targets>${target.names}</targets> <remote>true</remote> <verbose>true</verbose> <source>${project.build.directory}/lib/${deployArtifact.name}.war <name>${deploy.library.name}</name> </configuration> </execution> </executions> </plugin>
  • deploy.hostname/deploy.port = properties that are read in per environment to point to different server targets
  • deploy.userId = the userid used to login to the weblogic server
  • deploy.password = the password used to login to the weblogic server
  • target.names = the target is usually the cluster name for the environment
  • deploy.library.name = This is the name of the deployment of the console, which I may want to name differently than the war itself, since the war might contain Maven version/classifiers within the name.

Once I deploy this war, I may have the need to undeploy (which can be done via the console our through our plugin again:

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<plugin> <groupid>com.oracle.weblogic</groupid> <artifactid>weblogic-maven-plugin</artifactid> <version>${weblogic.version}</version> <execution> <id>undeploy</id><phase>clean</phase><goals><goal>undeploy</goal> </goals><configuration><adminurl>t3://${deploy.hostname}:${deploy.port}</adminurl><user>${deploy.userId}</user><password>${deploy.password}</password><upload>true</upload><action>undeploy</action><targets>${target.names}</targets><remote>true</remote><verbose>true</verbose><name>${deploy.library.name}</name></configuration> </execution> </plugin>

This configuration isn’t really much different. I just don’t need to supply the source and need to change the action to undeploy.

Another feature that I may want to do and can just become tedious based on the size of our deployments is to change the deployment order. This is not something that is capable through the WebLogic Server 11 plugin, so in this case I will utilize the WebLogic Server 12 plugin. The main difference is that now I am using the WebLogic Server 12 plugin, it has the capabilities to create domains, run wlst scripting, and other features that require an installation of WebLogic Server 12. This does not necessarily mean you have to install a WebLogic Server 12 in your environments, it just means that if you are using this plugin locally or via a CI Tool such as Hudson, you will need to install a WebLogic Server 12 into that environment so that the plugin can utilize the wlst shell and other scripts in order to use the plugin. This could be an issue for developers running the scripts locally, so in this case, I utilize profiles to run plugin configurations that use WebLogic Server 12 plugin so that developers can do deployments via the WebLogic Server 11 (which has no additional dependencies) and advanced features via WebLogic Server 12.

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</p>
<plugin><groupid>com.oracle.weblogic</groupid> <artifactid>wls-maven-plugin</artifactid> <executions><execution><phase>package</phase><goals><goal>wlst</goal></goals></execution> </executions> <configuration>      from java.util import * from javax.management import * import javax.management.Attribute
<p>
    print 'Updating deployment order .... '
</p>
<p>
    connect(System.getProperty("deploy.user"), System.getProperty("deploy.password"), System.getProperty("deploy.admin")) edit() startEdit() cd(System.getProperty("deploy.mbean")) cd(System.getProperty("deploy.library.name")) set ('DeploymentOrder', System.getProperty("deploy.order")) save() activate() disconnect()

  • deploy.user = the userid used to login to the weblogic server
  • deploy.password = the password use to login to the weblogic server
  • deploy.admin = the admin url for logging into the weblogic domain
  • deploy.mbean = AppDeployments or Libraries based on whether this is a war or something like an Optional Package
  • deploy.library.name = the exact name as it appears through JMX tree or console, for Optional Packages, this includes the version in a format such as deployName#deploySpecVersion@deployImplVersion

The space and indentation are important when including the script inline within the pom as opposed to having the wlst script as an external file. Another thing to mention is that the capability to open wlst shell, change the deployment order, and close the wlst shell appears to consume some resources and if I need to do this for multiple resources, I should do this in one connection. Otherwise I have run into issues where running this wlst plugin per resource (10+ resources) will crash our Hudson instance.

This plugin (and all the WebLogic Server 12 plugin goals) have to be run with a command line parameter to supply the installation directory for the WebLogic Server 12:

-DmiddlewareHome=%INSTALL_PATH%\Oracle\Middleware

In another post, I will explain how I utilize this plugin to deploy our Optional Packages as well as deploy our JMS/JDBC resources.

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